Naterdogg1

How to quit Adderall the easy way!

10 posts in this topic

Many people here are struggling with quitting and are despairingly worried about their future. Now that all your confidence is blown and the shield you put up with Adderall is broken, you get to be completely vulnerable. Luckily for you though, good things happen to those that are humble! It is the fastest way we learn. It may be painful, but the pain does eventually subside. For the first time in a long time you can now get rid of your problems instead of popping a pill and just dealing with them. The confidence you gain in your real life will blow Adderall's artificial confidence out of the water because you will actually feel like you earned it!

I made the decision to quit a little over 3 weeks ago. The first day was absolute hell. The second day wasn't much better and the third day was a relapse. In fact, there were quite a few relapses. It wasn't even until a few days ago that I realized why. ADHD is almost synonymous with impatience. If you think back long enough to the time when you were first put on medication, you would most likely realize the reason behind it was impatience. You needed help and the natural route wasn't fast enough, you wanted results NOW! That's why Adderall is so attractive. It offers instant relief from ADHD symptoms. Now I'm not saying ADHD is not real, but for most of us, Adderall was taken out of selfishness to help ourselves make our lives "normal". From a lack of patience!

Had I not gone through these steps however, I would have kept relapsing. Simply resisting that damn pill isn't enough. You have to make your life better than it was on Adderall. You need to see things are going to be better, and until you do, you will continue to fail. This is what I have learned. "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." -Albert Eintein

http://quittingadderall.com/how-to-quit-adderall/#phase1

I just wanted to expand on these as well based on my experience, because it might help someone.

Phase 1

This also involves making preparation. Just because you are still on Adderall at the moment doesn't mean you can't make yourself useful. You need to plan yourself a vacation of some sorts. At least for a week. The hardest variable about quitting will come from having a job. If you can't wait for a time off, you may have to wait for the holidays. I'm more than positive your boss will be willing to work with you!

Also don't get down about relapses. If you truly want to quit, they'll just remind you why. The relapses I had afterwards only made me so disappointed in myself that I had more determination to quit.

Phase 2

Absolutely no caffeine for at least two weeks!! Even at that point, you should limit your consumption to 2-3 times a week for emergencies only. Remember, you're already withdrawing from Adderall, why would you want to withdraw from caffeine? I mean do what you want, but you wont want to fall under the assumption that caffeine withdraws are weak compared to Adderall withdraws. Trust me I'm paying for that right now.

There's two things I want to say that I think are very important for everyone to hear!

First, I wasn't confident in this mess until I learned more about patience. It wasn't until I was truly patient that I was happy about quitting and getting through this. Patience is not simply waiting though, it is doing doing what we can with the hope and faith of something better. It is getting through the hard times of life with style. We don't know how the next 5 months will go, but we have faith that we will get through and be happy. After I learned this, I not only had a stronger desire to succeed, but it also became fun!!!

Second, you didn't waste your time on however many years you were on Adderall. It has been a great learning experience for all of us and there is no such thing as wasted time, as long as we learn from our mistakes. This is what life is about and learning is why we are here! Be happy that this mess will make you unique in a lot of ways and the happiness you will have from overcoming it will make you even more confident. Don't think of it as a nightmare think of it as a new beginning toward a life that suites you!! A new chapter in your life, cause that's exactly what it is ;)

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I enjoyed your post. Thanks for sharing, but the title made me want to hate you.... Of course I'm joking ;) I'm pretty sure there is no easy way... and you did make it sound kind of easy... but I'm glad you shared and I agree with the vacation. All I want and know I need is a vacation by myself to just sleep, read, reflect, maybe a walk... No expectations, just getting away from everything.

:)

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I have to agree with that title. I don't believe there's an easy way to quit adderall, but recognizing that patience is key makes it a heck of a lot more doable. In fact, I think patience is necessary in being successful when quitting, because it takes time to heal. Good for you for coming to that conclusion!

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Ashley, I know I read your story. Did you quit on your own or did you go to rehab? I really need a outpatient facility that will help me cope w/ my autoimmune issues and fatigue.... you know life skills. but i don't want to do group. i know i know, but i just need to find medical people that actually care enough to help someone who has been sick their whole life.

I may not do that, but I am totally determined and told my husband that I just want to get away. I wanted to check myself in somewhere but I probably won't need that. I'm weighing options and flowing lots of hopeless pms tears. I will be a better poster next time. I'm in a funk and so over this. I am truly ready to be healthy.

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I went to get an evaluation for rehab, but it would've been an outpatient program for adderall. It seemed like a great place to get help, it was just really expensive, and that's when reality set in. I then quit on my own attending AA meetings here and there and seeing a substance abuse counselor once or twice a week during early recovery. I still see her once every two weeks, and she's been a godsend. If you search you will find the resources you need to help you with this quit, to deal with your health issues, addiction issues, etc. I think reaching out for help shows strength, not weakness. Keep me posted!

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Waronwar, if you don't mind me asking.. how is your family relationship? The reason I ask is because it was a major factor behind me getting through this rough patch. Actually my relationship with my family was so bad that it was probably the biggest reason I quit. I realized that I was a complete ass and that I treated my dog better than my siblings.

When quitting it helped me to have a reason other than myself. You say you want to get away and IMO thats good, but only if you have the intent of quitting so you can work toward doing something that will lead to a happier relationship with your family. That way it's definitely worth fighting for and you get to be healthy AND feel good inside :) in a way that Adderall can't artificially bring.

My point is you are basically getting a second chance at life, you can use this time to start making good habits that you couldn't while on adderall. Be exactly who you want to be!

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My family relationship is okay and I have a wonderful husband. I have taken a break from medicine for a few days and, of course, haven't been very productive. I expect it would take me years to get the drug's damaging effects to go away. Having severe chronic fatigue in the first place, the only thing I know to do is go get a sleep study and do my best day to day. It certainly has never been a great life being so tired. No one will understand, but I'm used to this.

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Ashley,

I think I could do it alone with the proper medical support b/c I have severe fatigue issues. I agree w/ reality setting in and the expense. I was in a bad place the other day and just tired of it all. I still am, but I talked to my husband and he said I could see a doctor that is very good for people w/ difficult health issues.... The problem, he doesn't take insurance... People drive from other states to see him and some say that he has saved theiur lives b/c he thinks outside the box, does a wider array of tests and prescribes total lifestyle changes. I will keep you posted. It is so nice to have this forum for support!

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Waronwar, it sounds to me like you have the recipe for success (doing your best day to day, a good family life ect.). It's now just a matter of when! Unfortunately chronic fatigue can be caused by loads of different conditions, but they are almost all curable/treatable. Just remember to try different things and you'll find a solution. Trust me I've been where you're at before and I know how scary it can be. On the bright side however, you will be unstoppable when you find you're looking for.

Like I say it's just a matter of when! :)

Also remember there are medications that may help! Just because adderall didn't work out doesn't mean medications are useless all together!

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