mattn

Recently Quit - Followed the Weaning Procedure

5 posts in this topic

Hi, my name is Matt and last Wednesday (Oct. 2, 2013) I took my last dose of adderall (5mg). I received a prescription for adderall to help out with my ADHD a few years back.  Well, actually I started out on Focalin and switched over to adderall because it was cheaper as my doses were increasing (no generic Focalin available at the time). I'm one of those people who really didn't need to drug, but felt that I needed it because it made me feel good, which motivated me.  Likely, I would have been better off taking an SSRI instead of going down the stimulant route, but hindsight is 20/20.  

 

At my worst, I was taking 50mg of adderall a day. I knew that I was in over my head with the "addy" after I didn't take it one morning and I felt like absolute crap (physical pains and aches). Also, I felt extremely tired no matter how much I was taking.  I felt very distant and and socially isolated.  I couldn't accomplish anything without taking a dose beforehand (especially workouts).  My life revolved around timing the effects of the pills.  I couldn't take it anymore and decided that it was time to quit.  I found this website and decided to follow the "weaning off" procedure. Luckily for me, my doctor worked with me to help me wean off of the stuff.  

 

While off the pills, I'm still working out regularly, but am finding it difficult to become motivated some days.  I'm taking Zoloft (have been for awhile), and that helps, but I can't put as much on my plate anymore.  I'm a graduate student and some people have told me that I picked a bad time to quit, but I think that I made the right decision.

 

Does anyone have any tricks that help improve motivation? 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you definitely made the right decision. If the quitting is to overbearing you can just take a semester off. As a grad student, i can see it is really no big deal to take a semester off. And then just pick up where you left off. As for motivation, I would worry more on improving your motivation to stay off adderall rather than improving your motivation to do well in school. 

 

congratulations though on getting off the evilness.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations for quitting.  are you out of pills?

I suggest initially using caffeine in any form for your basic motivation needs.  Making lists and setting goals (with rewards and penalties) helps too with the big things you might struggle with.

Also, Please kep in mind that lack of motivation, mental clarity and enhanced depression are the hallmark symptoms of adderall withdrawl and recovery and it can take a year or longer to get over it.

Have you committed to stay quit or you just "trying it out"?

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your motivation will take a long time to return, as quit once said it can be up to a year or longer. Accepting this is a key to not relapsing.

 

Some tips:

 

1) Wellbutrin rather than Zoloft will make the transition easier. It helps with focus and motivation.

 

2) Procrastinating your work until close to deadlines should help. If you give yourself an hour, say, to write a short paper before a deadline, the adrenaline that comes with this urgency should help you get it done, and you won't have time to think about how much you hate this.

 

3) Accountability. Maybe you could have friends call you before something is due to make sure you did it, and harass you if it's not done yet. Until my natural motivation came back, the only motivation I could respond to was fear-based, so use accountability and procrastination to tap into that.

 

4) Make it a habit to do your work somewhere quiet, away from your house, like the library. Make your environment more conducive to working.
 

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum!  There is never a good time to quit, so there is no time like the present.  The whole motivation thing is a tough nut to crack; it will take time to come back.  Once I figure out the secret I'm not telling (just kidding).  I hope you continue to do well.  Congratulations on your decision to quit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now