hyper_critical

Couch to 5k

19 posts in this topic

“I don’t even know what’s going on...”

I’ve been lifting for a couple years now, but have been completely unwilling/unable to get consistent cardio going outside training to hike Mt Washington back in winter 2014. 

FINALLY downloaded the Couch to 5k app. What a beautiful program, that incorporates something about sustainable change it took me a while to learn off Adderall in other parts of my life. Program’s structured so you bite off less than you can chew initially, instead of going HAM from jump street and quickly burning out. 

Just finished week two of my 3x/week walk-jogs, and I feel great and hungry for more. 

Not going to pound on the table and suggest downloading it unless/until I complete the program and run a 5k in May. Then I’ll come back here and rant incessantly about it. 

Wish me luck!

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Nice! Will check it out! I do believe Cardio is a huge healer for our body and minds.

I have been struggling to push myself to do more cardio lately however so far after about 15-20min on equipment I get pretty much bored and end up with a little different fatigue than I get with weights. Days I over do Cardio often make me want to skip the gym the day after so a progressive approach if definitely key for me.

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HC,

That's so awesome!  I want to show you my favorite website for training plans.  This site will give you training plans for all distances and varieties of races.  I just started my training back for a half Ironman yesterday and it feels great.  I am so insanely out of shape and can't wait to be fit again.  Thank you so much for your help this week.  Means a lot. :)  Day 6 today.

 

http://www.halhigdon.com/training/51135/Marathon-Training-Guide

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On 3/11/2018 at 7:32 AM, LILTEX41 said:

 I want to show you my favorite website for training plans.

Thanks, LT! Great stuff there. 

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On 3/10/2018 at 6:22 PM, EricP said:

Days I over do Cardio often make me want to skip the gym the day after so a progressive approach if definitely key for me.

Yuge insight outside the gym too. I've had so many false starts at work, in my personal life, etc trying to bite off more than I could reasonably chew in the beginning. Sometimes it's good to have lofty goals so even if you fall short, you've come a long way. But when it comes to making structural changes around habits, etc, the progressive approach has been far more effective at bringing about sustainable change (note: I don't think this insight applies to breaking an addiction. Think cold turkey is far more effective, as a rule, than tapering off Adderall). 

Diet's a good example. I see people post here all the time with these complex supplement schedules and hardcore diets. I've tried and failed at many of those, and certainly understand why somebody would think they're a good idea. Much more effective? Start by bringing 5 Healthy Choice Simply Steamer lunches into the office on Monday. I've learned that if I eat ~1k calories by 2PM, I'm likely to make a good decision at night, and it completely cuts off the cycle of binge eating, feeling groggy in the morning, etc, which helps my focus, which cuts off the self-destructive loop of "maybe I'm just not cut out for this life without Adderall."

Is that a perfect solution? Absolutely not. Are there preservatives and all sorts of shit in there that I'd prefer to not eat? Sure. But I'm a 29 year old guy who until a few months ago was single and living alone, working 50 hours a week, doing recovery stuff another 10 hours/week, lifting weights, and doing other things in my community. I hate and am not good at cooking. So it's a good enough solution for me, that has completely eliminated all sorts of negative feedback loops that otherwise would enter my life.

Wish I didn't have to bang my head up against the wall for so long to learn these lessons, but I guess that's just how it goes for people like us. : )

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Thank you HC, I totally agree! We all share very similar issues here and diet and exercise is likely the biggest key to getting back on track. It's funny how hard it can seem to adapt to a new healthy lifestyle however it helps so much! I think in ways we are reverse programmed from our parents, doctors, friends etc always preaching to "eat healthy" diet, exercise etc it's a little rebellious in nature to resist it. On top of that adderall has changed our brains no doubt about that and it takes double the work for us to act upon and commit to good habits. 

I have been doing pretty good this past three weeks in eating and working out daily. I went out of town last weekend which bummed me out as there was no hotel gym, then just eating out of town in general it is hard to order healthy off menus of restaurants you do not know well. I did my best and upon coming home it was difficult already with 2 days off to get back into my healthy routine however I did it and got up early today to work out also before work. 

 

 

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@hyper_criticalI used couch to 5k a few yrs ago and had great success eventually moving up to 10k. I think having a series of short term goals is what helps to keep us really motivated. I can’t wait to use this again once my cardiovascular system starts to recover. I also used to love planning all my meals, ensuring I was getting the right mix of protein, vitamins and minerals etc. unfortunately I work 60hr weeks at the moment which makes it difficult to prepare meals and consistently train everyday. I may have to look into other options in the new yr so I can get my life/work balance back on track. Are you still putting in 50hr weeks? The steamed office meals are a great idea, I agree that when it comes to diet and exercise it needs to be built up gradually. It took me a good 6 months or more before I could run 10k but eating well certainly helps with energy levels. 

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Absolutely, SA. After a false start due to injury, I actually did the full Couch to 5K starting in July. Done 3 5K's now, and am doing my first 10K New Year's Day.

Dropped from 230-235 down to 180 the last six months. Running and keto. Great stuff.

Yea still putting in 50 hr weeks. I find I'm not very productive if I work much more. 

But first thing's truly first: getting and staying off Adderall one day at a time. I honestly don't regret the weight gain in my first year. Was my way of getting some comfort...my absolute 100% priority was getting clean. All the rest of the "Self-actualization" has come in due time. 

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I’m 30 days off Adderall and about to finish week 2 of the Couch to 5K myself! It’s a great program.

I completed the program a few years ago on Adderall. I’m hoping to do the same off the drugs!!

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After listing to audio book by David Goggins ‘Can’t Hurt Me’ inspired me to really start to push myself training and everyday activities. With the right mindset you can overcome anything and I’m done looking at my laziness with a pass I’m beyond that point of recovery to go easy on myself have for way too long. The audio book is awesome because it’s almost like a podcast with him going over the chapters just read. Gonna start running more done a couple 5ks but like to do 10k or a marathon next. Listing to him talk about his 24 hr 130 mile bad water race in the dessert was something else true inspiration. Give yourself a Christmas gift and download or buy that book. 

 

 

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"Frank" that's crazy. I literally just finished the audiobook this morning. 

I'm all jacked up as well. 

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i've made no effort whatsoever on the getting-in-shape thing for 3 years of recovery. maybe this is the inspiration i need--will give it a listen!

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Just finished the book Living With A Seal aka David Goggins guess I’m a fan, good book of inspiration for running along with pushing your personal boundaries.

 

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Finished the 10K in 1:03:19. Not bad for a guy who couldn't jog more than a few minutes six months ago. 

Aaaaaaand just signed up for a half marathon in April. Time to re-listen to Goggins...

Life off Adderall just keeps getting better and better. 

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2 hours ago, hyper_critical said:

Not bad for a guy who couldn't jog more than a few minutes six months ago. 

for serious? or is this an exaggeration lol, cause i feel like i'm right there and being able to run 10k seems like a fantasy!

i quit smoking about a year ago, so i feel better about that, but the biggest problem i have is severe shin-splits, which i understand is fairly common for new runners. i was thinking maybe it's the shoes? (i have a pretty shitty pair of sneakers, not designed for running). i am running outside on uneven ground, pavement, etc. i understand a treadmill or something would be easier, but don't have the room for one and i like being outdoors.

any suggestions? 

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For serious! Had been lifting heavy for about 18 months before I started running, but zero cardio. I started at the beginning with Couch to 5k. That was hard stuff.

I also have had terrible problems with shin splints. That's basically why I gave up the first time when I tried it in May. Got them on and off when training for the 10k as well. 

I bought compression socks. Not sure if they help or not. Think the issue for me is actually calf flexibility. So stretching and building up very, very slowly how much you're running is probably the prescription.

I also had a prescription for Diclofanec...basically suped up Advil, that I used occasionally when I could feel them coming. 

If you figure it out, let me know!

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@sleepystupid getting a pair of running shoes would probably help out a lot. If there isn’t much arch support in the shoes you’re wearing that’s definitely going to cause some pain. Extensive stretching is the next best thing you can do to prevent injury. Before and after you run. 

Running is one of the things I gave up when I started on Adderall. I ran 5 marathons in the two years before Adderall. I had to stop running because my heart rate would get so high I felt like I was going to pass out. Now I’m doing 4-5 mile runs and cycling a few times a week and it feels great. Planning on running another marathon next winter. 

Thinking back to my ‘exercise’ right after I got on amphetamines is sad and funny at the same time. I’d go to the gym, walk for 5 minutes on the treadmill, do 20 push-ups, get a smoothie, mess around on my phone for 45 minutes, and then walk back out the front door feeling like a legend. After a few weeks I just stopped going. It feels good to actually be pushing myself again. 

@hyper_critical good luck with the half marathon. I found the gap between 10k and half marathon to be far easier than from couch to 10k. You’ll do awesome. 

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Far as running to prevent injuries have any of you guys looked into minimalist shoe wear? I’ve heard how modern shoes trains us by design to be heal runners, I know for me I do even when I try not to. I have not read Christopher McDougall book but see some of his you tube videos and his theory of modern runner injuries linked to athletic shoes makes a lot of sense. Last summer I did a few hill runs in the grass barefoot think I pushed too hard and got a pretty bad calf injury. Actually I just felt it hurt but kept doing them then did a 5k when it shot to shit, I made the finish in good time but couldn’t walk for a couple days. But now  I’m considering buying a pair of minimalist shoes off amazon but this time taking things slow no barefoot hill runs or long runs right out the gate. 

 

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@Frank B  If you are used to running in traditional shoes with a high heel drop, you should gradually reduce to a minimalist shoe to prevent calf strain as well as incorporate daily calf stretches.   Runningwarehouse.com has a lot of good information on running shoes re: heel drop, stack height, etc.  It's like women who wear high heels all the time and their calf muscles shorten and they can't wear flats. 

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