LiberatedMind

Are there any forms of real life assistance, maybe a real life friend?

14 posts in this topic

I am starting to hate myself.  Nobody I know in my life can truly understand me as it stands now.  How do you develop real life therapeutic relationships?  Maybe that can help?  I have no money for therapists. 

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I’m sorry you feel that way. Are there any NA groups in your area where you could join a 12 step program? At least the people there will understand what you are going through and it won’t cost money to join. I’m thinking of doing this myself when I get back home. I hope you feel better soon. 

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I use this site also don’t be shy to contact someone directly on here with a personal message. Nobody understands what we are going through NA helps but honestly they are way behind dealing with this soon to come epidemic. The generation adderall is getting older soon they will all want to stop and absolutely nobody is prepared to deal with this. Quitting opioids does not have shit on this I know because I was addicted to them both. 

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@Frank B that’s interesting to know. I was under the assumption that NA was for everyone, not only opioid addicts. I absolutely agree that there is a huge lack of support groups out there for us. I have been lucky to stumble across this forum, there isnt anything online or otherwise (that I could find) for Dexamphetamine or adderrall addicts in Australia and it appears resources are slim elsewhere in the world. Even the drs laugh at me in disbelief when I tell them this shit is addictive and soul destroying. My psychiatrist even suggested I just increase the dose If it is no longer achieving the desired effect. The pharmaceutical and medical industry is corrupt as all hell IMO and we are making them filthy rich. 

I wonder if/what we or others could do to raise awareness of this issue? I feel we need our own 12 step program dedicated to prescription stimulant addicts. 

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1 hour ago, Socially awkward said:

My psychiatrist even suggested I just increase the dose If it is no longer achieving the desired effect.

While our relationship is doing really well all things considered, there are times when I feel we could benefit from talking to to a counselor but I would never risk going to someone without knowing beforehand their view on adderall. 

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On 3/15/2019 at 10:02 PM, oswhid said:

While our relationship is doing really well all things considered, there are times when I feel we could benefit from talking to to a counselor but I would never risk going to someone without knowing beforehand their view on adderall. 

I’ve been to a counselor she was good yet when it comes to long term effects on this stimulant she was totally in the dark as I’m sure 99% of counselors are. 

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On 3/15/2019 at 8:40 PM, Socially awkward said:

 that’s interesting to know. I was under the assumption that NA was for everyone, not only opioid addicts. 

I did ateened NA do think it’s good for any of us. But the part that is so unique with are addiction is the ridiculous amount of recovery it takes to be a productive person again. It’s like you quit most hard drugs and after a couple months things get better your more productive at work have more ambition etc. For us it’s just the opposite and most often you will have people saying maybe you should get back on it because you could lose your job or whatever. It’s tough would not wish this burden upon anybody. 

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20 hours ago, Frank B said:

It’s like you quit most hard drugs and after a couple months things get better your more productive at work have more ambition etc. For us it’s just the opposite and most often you will have people saying maybe you should get back on it because you could lose your job or whatever. It’s tough would not wish this burden upon anybody. 

yup. totally this.

most other hard drugs are associated with checking-out of life.

Adderall is the completely opposite - you start taking it to check-in to life more than you ever have.

we're not just addicted to the drug, we're addicted to the idea that there's a pill that can help us achieve our dreams of success. 

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3 hours ago, sleepystupid said:

we're not just addicted to the drug, we're addicted to the idea that there's a pill that can help us achieve our dreams of success. 

I was so addicted to the act of just taking a pill whenever I needed a boost.  I'm sure I got a tremendous placebo affect from taking the herbal stimulants that I used during my first year of recovery.  Even 5 hour energy and sugar free red bull provided the boost I used to seek from Adderall.  Just last weekend, I slammed a red bull in mid afternoon and happily went off into my day.

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Good thread starter. As an alcoholic, I can show up to any number of AA meetings and get the support I need. Adderall addiction is on the other end of the spectrum. These past four months have been lonely as hell. I think most of the NA meetings around here cater to opoid addicts. Stimulant addiction is barely talked about because the focus is all on opoids. The only real support I’ve found has been this forum.

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I feel no one has taken my addiction seriously because I was abusing a legal substance. Putting in longer hrs at work, studying a post graduate degree and killing it at the gym means there is “no problem”. It wasn’t until I started “checking out of life” when I eventually became so unwell I could hardly function, that alarm bells started to ring and people started to ask “are you ok?”.

Unfortunately I’ve come to associate everything in my life with Dexamphetamine. I fear I won’t be able to enjoy my work, training at the gym, study, visiting the same old places and people ever again without taking pills.  I think this is where our problem lies. The real struggle is learning to find these things enjoyable again without Adderrall (or Dex in my case) in our system. 

I was addicted to weed many yrs ago. In comparison this was way easier to quit as weed made me check out of life. The only thing I’d learned to associate with my habit was countless hours listening to music and playing guitar. After quitting I wasn’t able to get back into my music as I no longer found it enjoyable without weed. 

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On 19/03/2019 at 3:16 AM, Frank B said:

It’s like you quit most hard drugs and after a couple months things get better your more productive at work have more ambition etc. For us it’s just the opposite and most often you will have people saying maybe you should get back on it because you could lose your job or whatever. 

@Frank B yep, totally nailed it. 

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@Socially awkward this recovery is a chance to reinvent yourself a bit. New  places, people, and things. That doesn’t necessarily mean you need to quit your job or move, but working some things into your life that you do not associate with Dex is going to help so much. 

I totally feel you on the music and weed thing. It’s still my biggest trigger. I’ll be listening to a new song I like and find myself thinking “this song would really be awesome if I was high right now”. 10 1/2 months into sobriety I am starting to enjoy music again, although my taste has changed a bit. I think your appreciation for music could come back if you stay off the Dex long enough, it did for me. 

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@DrewK15 yes, you are absolutely right. I’m trying to do this at the moment, exploring new hobbies or activities I might enjoy. I hope I will still enjoy working out at the gym without Dex and that this activity hasn’t totally been ruined for me.  Maybe I’ll have to take up a new sport instead? I’m also reading up about healthy eating and nutrition that everyone recommends on here. I’m finding this recent change in my diet  is really helping me to feel more positive about life in general. I never ate on Dex but when I did, it was always heavily processed junk food. 

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