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Corey

I'm 5 weeks out and still easily fatigued. Is this normal?

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I flushed my remaining pills 5 weeks ago after a bad experience. After some initial success at being and feeling healthy and productive (after the withdrawal), I have been finding it increasingly difficult to get out of bed and stay productively awake. I exercise daily and eat reasonably well, but I still find myself unable many days to feel like a real participant in school (and life) because I just feel so damn tired all the time. I thought around the 3 and 4 week marks that if I just pushed through those feelings of sluggishness and forced myself to do work that I would eventually just feel normal again, but now it seems like I am backsliding into unhealthy lethargy, fatigue and depression. Is this normal? Should I just wait out these feelings or is there something beyond exercise and coffee-drinking I can do to combat the overwhelming urge to crawl back into bed all the time and close my eyes?

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I think this is completely normal. Energy and feeling normal comes in waves. I didn't expect to bounce back quickly, and I think that's a good way to look at it. Someone on this site told me to not view the quitting process as a linear, and it's so true. It's going to take awhile to get your normal energy back. I'm still not there, but it's slowly getting better. Congratulations on flushing the pills. Just do what you have to do to get by for awhile. The supplement l-tyrosine is talked about a lot on this site, and I found it helpful.

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Yup, it's normal to lack energy and motivation after you have quit. It took me about ten weeks before I began to regain my productivity. And it took about a year before I felt my "old self" making a sustained comeback. Do whatever you have to do (short of drugs) to boost your energy. Coffee. L-tyrosine. RedBull. Iced tea. 5 hour energy. Fish oil. Vitamin D. Avoid sugar binges. If you simply miss taking pills then go out and buy some kind of energy pills at GNC and take 'em just like you used to take adderall. Whatever you do or don't do, you should start noticing some substantial improvement in your energy and motivation around three months. Stick with it, Corey; freedom and better health are only two of many reasons to stay off this shit forever.

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I don't think it's my business to tell anyone to take or look into SSRIs, but I feel like they are helping me reach normality again.

I drained my brain out of dopamine, I was exhausted, feeling depressed-like the world was dark, couldn't stop crying and I knew I'd turn to Adderall. Adderall was initially prescribed to me to fix the following issues I addressed, when really I needed to be on an antidepressant.

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Do you live in the north? It could be the change in daylight hours - just a thought. Me and most people I know get a little sluggish when it starts being dark all the time. During the summer I stay busy, happy and productve and don't need much sleep b/c the sun's always shining. Go to a tanning bed or get one of those plant growing lights.

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Hi everyone, thank you for the advice. Sorry to only post when I'm wallowing, but I need some guidance. I was too depressed today to go to my morning class, and yesterday I just blew off an evening class because I didn't feel like it. Up until now I've been pretty good about forcing myself to at least show up to things, but now, I feel like it's not getting any easier to show up and do the work since when I first quit adderall, and some days it actually feels harder. I'm seeing someone tomorrow to talk about feeling depressed; part of me wants to ask for another adderall script just so I can feel like I'm the best among my peers again (I really was the best) but I know oscillating between adderall-fueled mania and depression is unhealthy. Honestly, though, it seems preferable to just general melancholy and complete lack of motivation

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Corey,

This is a normal part of quitting, and it is my definition of misery, but not as miserable as the adderall ups and downs, once you start to balance out. I was a depressed mess for 3 months after quitting. I finally went to the doctor because I wasn't improving and got on antidepressants. It's helped me a lot. I'm not one to think that solving a pill problem with another pill is the right thing for everyone, but I don't view antidepressants like adderall. Lexapro has helped a lot! You're considering going back on the adderall after you've seen what it's created for you in it's aftermath? It's not worth it, because it's unsustainable. I was self-medicating with the adderall, which ended in disaster.

I think quit-once said it best:

Most "dues" are paid up front but this addiction collects its dues on the back end. And the dues are not paid in money but in recovery time.

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Thanks, Ashley, that was helpful to read. The urge to go back on adderall when I'm feeling low is very strong, and it's really nice to have a concentrated community like this reaffirming what a terrible idea that is. Most of my friends don't really get why I would struggle so much with the drug and I never feel comfortable admitting that weakness to anyone. I can't praise this site enough for being an extremely helpful resource in helping overcome adderall addiction.

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I understand the urge! It's the addiction talking. It tells us the only thing that's going to make us feel better and be who we want to be is the culprit, adderall. Hang in there!

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Corey Hay brother what the hell are you thinking about you want to get a new script. Do you remember how shity you where feeling when you where on the junk listen to our sister ashley see tells it strait up you will be depressed for some time it will pass if it don’t pass in two mounts or so then you may need a antidepressant drug butt please NO NO NO NO don’t use the shit adderall. You will hate your self if you go back. Do you want to be a zombie again or a little depressed for a wile. Don’t let us down my brother better yet don let your self down it will pass trust experience members like ashley.

A song for you NEVER GOING BACK AGAIN by FLEETWOOD MAC

On RUMOURS Your friend FALCON

Bee strong stronger then the erg time will heel you.

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dude, I don't know your history with it or anything, but I will tell you this- however many days ago last Saturday was was the last time I took it and fuck an A I feel good today.... Without sounding like a cliche tool I hope I can say, It Does Get Better! Hang tough thru the urges, if you get thru one you'll see they do pass.....

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Corey I feel your pain. I was taking adderall for 7 years and stopped 3 weeks ago. I feel like total crap every day. I've been sleeping every chance I get 10 plus hours every day. When I do manage to get out of bed, within an hour I'm ready to go back. I have absolutely no motivation. The first 2 weeks my body hurt constantly. That has subsided to some extent but mental and physically I feel like hell every day. I keep hoping tomorrow things might be better, but to date have been dissappointed every time. I can't offer any words of wisdom on how eventually you will feel better, but wanted to let you know that you are not alone.

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I think you and I must be at the same stage... I quit 5 weeks ago today. Since then, I've gained 10lbs, and have had on average about 66% of those days sitting on the couch. Just. No. Motivation.

People say you feel more like working out. I can't stand looking at myself in the mirror at the gym, have zero stamina and get really sore bones (if that's possible) even going for long walks.

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Goldman, I did not feel like working out when I quit. You're going through the rite of passage to adderall sobriety. All of us know how awful it is. But it's the only way out of the addiction.

Adderall withdrawal is so awful in such a unique way, only adderall addicts could understand it.

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Adderall withdrawal is so awful in such a unique way, only adderall addicts could understand it.

I think I'd like to put this as my screensaver, it's so true! :)

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yup 5 weeks out I was still very tired.  You are close to having a good day tho so keep with it. Once you have that one good day you will be hooked on sunshine, exercise and green tea.  :D

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