SoulRevival

Members
  • Content count

    7
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

5 Neutral

About SoulRevival

  • Rank
    Newbie

Recent Profile Visitors

1,164 profile views
  1. ADD is not real

    There's no way to tell if you have ADD from those factors alone. They could also indicate clinical depression. What's more important to look at is whether or not you have executive functioning challenges. Problems w/ attention is a small piece of what ADD is all about.
  2. ADD is not real

    There's some belief that ADHD is biological, rather than genetic. It's been linked to early childhood trauma. Meaning, people have a genetic predisposition to developing it, but their early experiences determine whether those neural differences develop. As far as prevalence across cultures- access to health care, education about the disorder, and stigma around the disorder and medication are huge factors that come into play here. There is no way to accurately determine the prevalence of any disorder across cultures because of the impact of these factors. Sorry, I'm a cognitive psychologist that specializes in ADHD so I'm pretty passionate about the issue. More than anything, I think it's really important for people to be educated about, PROPERLY diagnosed (I use 7 separate assessments), and treated for ADHD (with or w/out meds) because otherwise, it can cause a host of serious problems for people including...................stimulant addiction.
  3. ADD is not real

    Yes, there have been hundreds of studies actually. Search dopamine and ADHD in Google Scholar.
  4. ADD is not real

    ADD/ADHD most certainly exists. ZK has it right, and it being labeled a "disorder" is a total misnomer. There are a ton of positive aspects to having ADHD, but of course, there are some very real challenges that arise in traditional school and work settings especially. People think ADD is all about attention. Actually, that is a very small piece of it. The aspects of ADD that cause the most significant problems for people are executive functioning challenges- like impulse control, and managing overwhelm. Unmanaged ADHD and addiction is EXTREMELY common, especially with stimulant addicts. People with ADHD brains' produce less dopamine, stimulants release dopamine, that's why they're prescribed to treat the disorder. That being said, and speaking from personal experience that most of us can relate to- Adderall is totally whack. It doesn't matter if you have ADD or not, taking amphetamines regularly is not a good idea. I've taken other drugs for my ADD and NOTHING affects me the way Adderall or Concerta does (the amphetamine-class drugs) Other drugs actually slow my roll and curb my symptoms without making me feel like PCP superman. The sad thing is that abusing stimulants amps up natural symptoms of ADD, as it takes a while for your brain chemistry to resettle.
  5. Hi All, I'm curious how many Adderallics actually have an ADHD diagnosis, or if you just faked symptoms for the prescription. I'm interested in hearing the stories of people who have a real ADHD diagnosis and are trying to stay off Adderall because using it had serious negative effects on their life. I'm someone who has ADHD, and also seriously abused Adderall. I take Strattera now which is the main non-stimulant medication that treats ADHD. I'm very aware of all the ways in which the diagnosis affects my life, which makes staying off a drug that treats those symptoms even more difficult. When I get stressed out from work, my mind automatically defaults to - "This wouldn't be happening if I could treat my ADHD like everyone else." I've been off Adderall for a year and a half, and plan to stay that way. But managing symptoms of ADHD, especially difficulty with impulse control and low frustration tolerance, makes staying off any drug even harder. Any support, or personal experience is welcome and appreciated. Sarah
  6. San Francisco Bay Area

    hi shyfox, i'm the original poster. I have been off Adderall for a year and a half and life is way better. i would be happy to talk to you.
  7. I'm looking to start a group in SF...casual meet-ups, mutual support, etc. Anyone interested? ~Sarah